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English Curriculum

Writing

 

KS1 & 2

Each half term KS1 and KS2 focus on one ‘Purpose for Writing’.  There area four ‘Purposes for Writing’, which are:

  • Writing to Entertain
  • Writing to Inform
  • Writing to Persuade
  • Writing to Discuss

Each ‘Purpose for Writing’ includes a range of writing outcomes. Examples of these are:

  • a character description
  • a letter
  • poetry
  • a recount

Each English Unit teaches for one writing outcome. It follows a teaching sequence that follows over three phases.

Phase 1- immerses the children in reading and also provides opportunities to explore a range of texts, identify language features and collect writer hints and vocabulary.

Phase 2- gives opportunities for children to gather their ideas, orally rehearse and plan their writing.

Phase 3- gives opportunities for shared writing, modelling, guided and independent writing and also for drafting, revising and editing.

Writing for a Purpose – guidance notes

 

Reading

 

NURSERY

Stories for Talking (3 weeks each half term) – discreet teaching of tier 1 and 2 vocabulary.

3-a-Day’ stories – adult reads familiar books to the children; following a prescribed list of titles (stored in Nursery).

Shared Reading’ every day – linked to ‘Stories for Talking’ during the 3 weeks, linked to Literacy/ Topic and during other weeks.

Activities (linked to the book that leads the Topic) within different areas of continuous provision – copies of the stories available for the children to read independently.

Summer Term: ‘Guided Reading’ – groups of 3 children – 10 minutes (not delivered during ‘Stories for Talking’ weeks) – using books with text.

A book sent home each week for parents to share with their child – focus is on ‘Concepts About Print’.

A ‘Treasure Pack’ (free book parcel) given to each child in Autumn Term 2; this is preceded by a parents meeting, led by nursery staff (invite Longsight Library manager) talking about ways to support children’s reading at home.

Nursery children, and their parents, visit Longsight Library during the summer term.

RECEPTION

 ‘2-a-Day’ stories – adult reads familiar books to the children; following the prescribed list of titles (stored in Reception).

 ‘Shared Reading’ every day – teaching, modelling and reinforcing reading and comprehension strategies.

‘Talk for Writing’ approaches (oral rehearsal of stories) used within English lessons.

The school’s Reading Strategy Visual Cards used as a teaching tool eg. ‘use the picture’ – the same visuals displayed on the reading working wall.

High Frequency ‘Tricky’ Words sent home to learn – the same high frequency words displayed on the reading working wall.

‘Guided Reading’ – groups of 4 children – 20 minutes each group each week.

In the summer term (as soon as possible) – aiming for a complete carousel of activities every day (see table below) – 6 children in a group where possible for 20 minutes.

guided reading visual

‘Stories for Talking’ delivered as an intervention (as appropriate).

A ‘Ready to Read’ (free book parcel) is given to each child in Spring Term 1; this is preceded by a parents meeting, led by reception staff, to; talk about ways to support their child’s reading at home, introduce the ‘Ready to Read’ parcels and to model a story telling session.

Booktrust ‘Ant Club’ activities (two separate sets of free ‘Reception’ resources delivered to school yearly) used as a way of involving parents in the children’s learning – Parents meetings/ visits held when introducing each activity.

YEARS 1 AND 2

‘Guided Reading’ organised as a carousel of activities delivered daily (see table below) – groups of no more than 6 children of similar reading attainment – 30 minute sessions – all children have at least one guided session with an adult each week.

 

guided reading visual KS1

Use of the school’s Reading Strategy Visuals as a teaching tool eg.’sound it out’, ‘Re-run’, and the same visuals displayed on the reading working wall.

An additional guided reading session delivered by the teacher during assemblies three times a week.

A minimum of one book-banded reading book sent home to read twice a week.

Children read with an adult in school three times a week – teacher, teaching assistant, lunchtime organiser.

Shared Reading’ every day within English lessons – teaching, modelling and reinforcing reading and comprehension strategies and objectives.

‘Talk for Writing’ approaches (oral rehearsal of stories) used within English lessons.

KS1 SATs question starters used orally with the children and written answers modelled in Year 2.

In Year 2, children practise reading at speed and scanning for words/ answers quickly in texts each week.

Year 1 – Booktrust ‘Ant Club’ activities (two separate sets of free ‘Year 1’ resources delivered to school yearly) used as a way of involving parents in the children’s learning – Parents meetings/ visits held when introducing each activity.

A Parents’ Meeting for each year group held early in the Autumn Term to talk about the year group’s reading systems, national expectations, and phonics and to explain the way in which parents can support their child at home.

A meeting for Year 1 parents held in the spring term to provide information about the ‘Year 1 Phonic Check’.

A meeting for Year 2 parents held in the spring term to provide information about the national KS1 reading SATs test.

The Fischer Family Trust Wave 3 reading programme is followed daily on a 1:1 basis for children working significantly below their peers. All support staff are trained to deliver this programme.

YEARS 3 – 6

Whole Class Reading – In all Year 3, 4, 5 and 6 classes there is a daily lesson that follows a (flexible) comprehension teaching sequence  (see sequence below) that is completed over one week. Age-appropriate texts are used, such as an extract from a high quality fiction text or an article from ‘First News’. The teacher reads the text in advance to identify specific features and plan lessons. This includes selecting vocabulary to pre-teach, clarifying words, identifying text features such as similes, considering text layout such as columns, paragraphs and headline, and identifying paragraphs (if relevant) suitable for visualising purposes, including inference. The teacher also considers the ways in which the writer has used specific language to impact the reader, such as the use of short sentences to create tension and the way in which they have portrayed character’s feelings and created atmosphere. The teacher also generates questions (or additional questions) to ensure a range of literal and inferential, using KS2 SATs question starters.

The teacher models the use of consistent language when locating specific parts of a text and supports the children to use the same language e.g. “The word is in the second column, the fourth paragraph that begins ‘Unfortunately…’ and is on the third line.”

The teacher models the approach of understanding a written question, scanning for the answer, generating a response and writing it down on a wipe board. Children practise the same approach and then the teacher selects 3-4 responses to share, discuss and improve with the class. The answer only (not a full sentence) is written, with words from the text spelt correctly.

The children complete a series of written questions at the end of each teaching sequence, either independently or with a partner’s support if needed. Answers are self or peer marked, with red pens used to ‘polish’ answers.

All children access the lesson, unless they are reading significantly below age-related expectations.

Children work in mixed-attaining pairs in lessons and these pairings remain the same throughout a minimum of two teaching sequences. On every third text the children work independently and this is used as an opportunity, by the teacher, for formative assessment. The ratio of pupil/adult talk should be 70/30 with children encouraged to talk with their partner.

The teacher always reads the text, at least once, for the children first. The children then read the text with their partner, as often as needed, before eventually reading it independently. The text is read every lesson so that it becomes familiar to the children. This develops the children’s phrasing, fluency, intonation, expression and speed.

Children reading at early book-band levels follow an alternative ‘differentiated’ teaching sequence during the whole-class reading lesson. This sequence focuses on ‘who, where, when, what happened elements of a story and is led by support staff.

Whole Class Reading Teaching Sequence

Guided Reading – during assembly, teachers deliver a guided reading session oforup to 6 children, grouped according to their current reading attainment. Children read a book at their instructional level. The main objective of the session is reading accuracy and speed. Children read books during these sessions and not extracts. If a lesson is missed, every effort is to be made to deliver the lesson later in the week instead. This may happen during a Topic lesson where children are completing an independent research task.

Individual Reading – ‘ERIC’ (Everyone Reading In Class) / Accelerated Reader (AR) is a daily lesson for individual reading at the child’s own level. Children always have their own book that they are reading. The main purpose of the daily lesson is to improve children’s reading stamina and to increase the number of written words read. Motivational systems are used to encourage children to read extensively and to read books with challenge. These books are also take home for continued reading.

All adults use ERIC/ AR time to read with their two target children (children are selected each half term). The class teacher uses one lesson each week to find out how much children have been reading and how successful they have been by asking questions about the book or by AR quiz results, and sets new targets with children.

The AR books are kept centrally in the upstairs hall. Children visit the AR area, during their daily AR lesson time only, to select and change books. Children select one book, at their reading level, which they read in class and at home. They then complete a quiz once they have finished reading the book.

‘Shared Reading’ almost daily within English lessons – teaching, modelling and reinforcing reading and comprehension strategies and objectives.

Use KS2 SATs style question starters (updated following 2018 SATs analysis advice) orally with children and model written answers – reinforce the fact that only the answer is written and not a full sentence.

Weekly practise reading at speed and scanning for words/ answers quickly in texts.

A Parents’ Meeting for each year group held early in the Autumn Term to talk about the year group’s reading systems and national expectations and to explain the way in which parents can support their child at home.

A meeting for Year 6 parents held in the spring term to provide information about the national KS2 reading SATs test.